Tag Archives: wire glass fire rating

Wood Stove Glass


If you are looking for quality wood stove glass for your home heating needs, Bear Glass can provide custom wood stove glass doors that have been heat treated to increase strength and thermal shock and prevent injury due to breakage.

Ideal Solution for Woodstove Glass Replacement

Are you looking for woodstove glass replacement? Bear Glass can offer super heat resistant neoceram that is the perfect solution for use as cast iron wood stove glass doors where the panels are less than 6 inches from the hot burning fire.

The glass in your wood stove door or fireplace gives you a clear view of the fire burining. This is part of the ambiance of having a wood stove or fireplace. When you have glass in the wood stove door, it makes it that much more enjoyable to have a fire burning on a chilly fall evening or a cold winter day. Sometimes, due to accidents, the wood stove glass gets broken. We can replace it for you. We custom cut the woodstove glass to meet your needs. If it is curved or any shape other than a rectangle, provide us with a template and we’ll cut it to your specifications. Bear Glass specializes in 24 hour turn-around so you have your wood stove glass back in your woodstove door and you are back in service, once again enjoying a romatic fire on a chilly evening.

Neoceram® is commonly referred to as glass but it is actually a transparent ceramic. Neoceram is 3/16″ or 5mm thick. Unlike true glass, NeoCeram® withstands continuous exposure to high temperatures without fear of destruction. It is also resistant to failure due to temperature variation. This makes it the ideal solution for many wood stoves and fireplaces where glass panels are less than 6 inches from the flames. We offer optional tints or colors for your custom order.


Neoceram™ is a transparent low expansion glass-ceramic with a number of outstanding features that include high resistance to thermal shock, high mechanical strength, and excellent electrical characteristics. With an almost zero thermal expansion coefficient, the applications for Neoceram continue to grow from Wood Stoves, Gas Fireplaces, Electric Heaters to High Tech Applications.

About Neoceram Neoceram™ is commonly referred to as glass but it is actually a transparent ceramic. Neoceram™ is 3/16″ or 5mm thick. Ideal Solution for Woodstoves. Unlike annealed glass (Regular Float), Neoceram withstands continuous exposure to high temperatures without the fear of destruction. It is also resistant to failure due to temperature variation. It is the ideal solution for many wood stoves and fireplaces where glass panels are less than 6 inches from the flames.

Strength and Durability Neoceram can take the heat! Continuous temperatures up to 1470°F (700°C) can be withstood because this ceramic has an extremely low thermal coefficient of expansion. It doesn’t run or swell at high temperatures the way normal glass does.

Field Tested against Underwriters Laboratories (UL-1482) impact test Neoceram™ is a glass product that offers continuous, high temperature use (700°C / 1470° F) with no fear of destruction from high heat or temperature variation (water or snow on hot glass). Whether burning gas or wood, today’s high efficiency stoves and fireplaces can produce intense heat. While ordinary tempered glass withstands temperatures up to approximately 250° C (500°F), higher levels of heat may cause it to crack and shatter or worse explode out of your fireplace. For builders and home owners, that can mean costly replacements – or worse!

Thanks to modern technology, there is now an alternative! With the transparency of glass and the heat-resistant characteristics of ceramic. Neoceram™ can tolerate continuous temperatures up to 1470° F – nearly three times the heat resistance of tempered glass. Neoceram™ cannot be broken by heat during typical usage in a wood stove or gas fireplace.

Neoceram glass ceramic enables hearth appliance manufacturers and dealers to provide their customers with safe, high-efficiency gas- and wood-burning stoves and fireplaces, while maintaining the latest design options. Neoceram can withstand continuous temperatures up to 1, 292° F—nearly three times the heat resistance of tempered glass. It is ideal for use in high-efficiency heating appliances and cannot be broken by heat during typical usage.

Neoceram – PYROCERAM CERAMIC GLASS – STOVE GLASS available in 3/16″ thickness only. Only genuine pyroceram ceramic glass is used High temperature Pyroceram ceramic glass is suitable for use in wood, pellet and coal burning stoves. It’s thermal shock rating of 1380° F makes it ideal for any application where high temperature tolerance is required. Rarely used for fireplace doors. It often is used in industrial high temperature applications.

We currently stock Pyroceram, there is no visual or performance difference between pyroceram, neoceram, or robax, The difference is just trademarks, all 3 are transparent high temperature ceramic glass with a 1380° F thermal shock tolerance with a slight amber tint, slight texture, and available in 5mm (3/16) thickness.

We ship  Woodstove Glass world wide.

For more information, please contact us at:

FACTORY/OFFICE

Address:

Bear Glass Inc.

399 20th Street

Brooklyn, NY 11215

Phone: 718-832-3604

Fax: 718-832-0786

Email: bearglass@yahoo.com

BEAR GLASS WIRE GLASS


 

Bear Glass has the answers you are looking for regarding wire glassWire glass is used in fire-rated windows and doors because it meets most fire codes. It is made by feeding a welded wire net into the molten glass before it enters the rollers. The wire does not add strength to the glass, but it does hold the glass in the sash if it shatters.

The process of wire glass, or wired glass, is sheet glass in which wire mesh has been inserted during production. The impact resistance of this glass is similar to that of normal glass, but in case of breakage, the mesh retains the pieces of glass. This product used to be accepted as low-cost fire glass but is no longer acceptable for this use. Now, wire glass is mostly used for windows because of it exceptional security qualities. Clear wire glass and obscure wire glass is available at Bear Glass.

Wire glass is a common sight in schools, businesses, and hotels across the nation. Wire glass is manufactured primarily as a fire retardant, with wire mesh inlaid in the glass to prevent it from shattering and breaking out under stress or when exposed to high temperatures. With the window intact, the wire glass keeps the fire at bay, protecting those on the other side from the harmful effects of smoke and flame.

Wire glass typically comes in two types — Misco and boxed. Misco is also called diamond wire glass. In boxed wire glass, the wire is rotated 45-degrees, so that it makes s a checkerboard pattern, rather than diamonds.

There are pros and cons of installing wire glass.

There are many myths about wire glass and its proper usage. Primarily, most people assume that that the incorporation of wire into the glass makes it stronger, and that this makes it a good option for security glass. Actually, the wire in the glass actually weakens the wire glass from a strength standpoint, and makes it more susceptible to breaking. What the wire does do for the glass is hold it in place. That makes it safer from the standpoint that a broken window won’t send glass fragments showering through a room (hence its use in schools), and that the wire will hold the glass in place under extreme temperatures (hence its status as fire rated glass).

Wire glass is a smart addition in any area where a solid fire barrier and safety glass are beneficial. This includes using wire glass in public areas such as schools, public buildings, and businesses, and particularly in areas of these buildings that provide escape routes in case of fire. Windows in stairwells and in hallways that lead to emergency exits are prime examples of areas where fire rated wire glass is a smart addition.

We ship wire glass world wide.

For more information, please contact us at:

FACTORY/OFFICE

Address:

Bear Glass Inc.

399 20th Street

Brooklyn, NY 11215

Phone: 718-832-3604

Fax: 718-832-0786

Email: bearglass@yahoo.com

Bear Glass Fire Rated Glass

When you think of fire protection in a building, what comes to mind? Fire extinguishers? Smoke alarms? Sprinkler systems? Chances are that window glass wasn’t at the top of the list. While fire-rated glass has been an important component in building safety for decades, most professionals in the industry know relatively little about it. As a result, it isn’t difficult for the incorrect product to be specified, installed and approved – potentially putting lives and property at unnecessary risk.

We’ll begin with some basic definitions. Just what is fire-rated glass? As the name implies, it is glass that has proven to offer a certain degree of protection in the face of fire. That may sound like a strange task for glass to perform. Obviously, glass can’t extinguish a fire or warn a building’s occupants that there’s any danger. But fire-rated glass can help keep flames and smoke from spreading from one room to another. The official term for this is compartmentation, and it means that glass can play a vital role in restricting fire damage to a limited area.

To the casual observer, it would seem that any glass could do that. After all, fire-rated glass looks deceptively similar to its non-rated counterparts. However, in reality, most glass offers little, if any, fire protection. For instance, standard window glass will break when the temperature reaches approximately 250° F. Tempered glass can last until about 500°F. In contrast, fire-rated glass can typically survive heat in excess of 1600° F. That’s a marked difference in performance. With structural fires capable of reaching extremely high temperatures very quickly, the need for this specialty glass is easy to recognize.

To earn its stripes, fire-rated glass must pass a battery of tests established by national test standards. Independent laboratories (such as U.L.) run the tests, then assign an appropriate rating based on the results. The ratings are time increments, reflecting the duration of testing the product endured. That duration is intended to correspond to the length of time the glass should be expected to perform reliably in a fire. So if a product has a 45 minute rating, theoretically you could count on it containing flames and smoke for the first 45 minutes of a fire.

The testing is conducted in two parts. First, several pieces of the glass are installed in the wall of a large furnace. The wall might contain doors, sidelites, transoms, windows, etc. Following a strict time/temperature curve, the heat in the furnace is raised to an intense level, simulating conditions in a burning building. In order to successfully pass the test, the glass must remain in the frame. Cracking is allowed, provided the glass can still act as a barrier to flames and smoke.

Assuming the glass survived that portion of the test, there is a second phase required in the U.S. for a rating of 45 minutes or more. This is called the hose stream test, and it demonstrates the ability of the glass to withstand what is know as thermal shock. A fire hose with a high pressure nozzle is brought in to douse the hot glass with water at a pressure of at least 30 psi. Most glass cannot tolerate the stress of having one area hot and the other cool at the same time, and so it will shatter. If sprinklers come on during a fire, or if fire fighters arrive with extinguishers and hoses, it is quite possible for hot glass to be exposed to water. The last thing anyone would want at that point would be for the glass to vacate an opening, leaving room for the flames and smoke to spread. The hose stream test thus tests the integrity of the glass, framing system, and surrounding materials.

Once a product has completed the rigorous test process, it is assigned a fire rating. Ratings generally run anywhere from 20 minutes to 3 hours. Building codes then dictate where those differently rated products would be allowed in a building. In general, the codes are designed to take into account how long it will take people to exit a building in the event of a fire.

As you might suspect, many of the locations (such as doors and sidelites) requiring fire-rated glass are also locations where impact safety is a concern. This used to pose a real dilemma, because product options were very limited. None of the glass that had high impact ratings could pass the fire tests, and the fire-rated glass (typically wired glass) wasn’t strong enough for more than the minimum impact testing. So there often had to be a compromise. Today, however, there are several wireless glass products available that offer high levels of both fire and impact safety.

Impact ratings indicate what can be expected if someone (or something) runs into the glass. To test for impact, a 100 lb. bag of lead shot is dropped against a vertical piece of glass. The bag is raised to various heights for the different ratings to approximate the impact of individuals coming in contact with the glass. Afterwards, the breakage pattern of the glass is closely examined to determine whether or not it would be considered a hazard.

If you see a piece of wired glass with a label that says ANSI Z97.1, that means the glass has been tested to withstand 100 ft./lb., similar to impact of a small child. On the other hand, glass labeled as meeting CPSC 16CFR1201 (Category II) withstands 400 ft./lb. That is similar to the impact of a fast moving, full-grown adult.

When you multiply the number of fire ratings with the different safety ratings, you can see that the possible combinations are impressive. But ratings alone do not distinguish the various types of fire-rated glass on the market today. Each product has its own unique characteristics, making the decision process even more complex.

Despite all the variety, the field can be organized in a fairly simple and logical way. All fire-rated glazing falls into the following four primary categories:

Bear Glass Polished Wired Glass is far and away the most well known product in the industry. Used for more than a century, it has a solid track record. Most codes were originally written around wired glass, because for many years it was the only glass that could pass the fire testing. Wired glass is able to pass the hose stream test, and has earned a 45 minute rating (even higher in very small door sizes). Code and fire officials have been able to instantly recognize the wire mesh as a sign that glass was fire-rated.

In some instances, however, that same wire mesh has presented an undesirable “institutional” image. And occasionally, people have mistakenly assumed that the wire mesh makes the glass more impact resistant. Truth be told, wired glass is a relatively weak glass that only meets minimal 100 ft./lb. impact standards. With that in mind, even though wired glass is readily available and easily affordable, great care should be taken if it is installed in areas where impact safety is a concern, such as schools and other high traffic areas. Some schools, with liability issues in mind, use high impact fire-rated glass – even if initial costs are higher.

Bear Glass Ceramic Glass is a category of fire-rated glazing that has entered the market during the past 12 years. Ceramic has long been known for its amazing ability to withstand heat and thermal shock. That’s why today you can find ceramic in everything from cooktops to car engines. Once the technology was developed to form a clear product out of ceramic, it didn’t take long to see the potential for its use as a fire-rated glass.

Bear Glass Transparent and Wireless, Ceramic Glass offers a distinct aesthetic advantage. It comes in a range of make-ups that can provide many different characteristics: fire ratings up to 3 hours, high impact safety ratings, sound reduction, etc. It can also be beveled, etched or sandblasted without affecting the fire rating. It is even available in insulated glass unit (IGU) make-ups that comply with energy codes for use in exterior applications.

Bear Glass Specialty Tempered Glass has become a popular alternative for low level fire safety. It is clear, wireless and has a fairly moderate initial investment. High impact ratings make it suitable for some door applications. However, it does have some serious drawbacks that are important to note.

Unlike other fire-rated glazing products, specially tempered glass doesn’t pass the hose stream test. In an actual fire, if sprinklers activate nearby and even a small amount of water hits the hot glass, it will likely fall out of its frame – quite possibly within just a few minutes. That’s why it has only been able to comply with standards for a 20 minute rating. Many times this type of material has been inappropriately substituted for wired glass or other higher performance fire-rated glass, when in fact it does not carry the same fire rating. If sprinklers are anywhere near the opening, this product should not be considered.

Bear Glass Transparent Wall Units make up the final category of fire-rated glass, and in reality, they are in a class by themselves. They are tested and classified as “walls, ” even though they are made of glass. Their claim to fame is their resistance to heat tranfer. Transparent wall units can actually block significant amounts of heat from transfering through the glass. A fire could be raging on one side and you could literally still place your hand on the other side of the glass. For areas such as stairwells where people could be trapped for long periods of time, or in sensitive computer areas, or where large expanses of glass are used, transparent wall panels serve a genuine need.

There are different kinds of these products on the market. Some are insulated units filled with a clear gel that turns to an opaque foam during a fire. Others are made of multiple layers of glass (similar to bullet resistant glass) with intumescent interlayers that turn opaque during a fire. Both styles of products have ratings of up to 2 hours, withstand the fire hose stream test and offer high impact safety ratings. Thanks to new framing that is now available, architects can incorporate these transparent wall and door units from floor to ceiling in their designs, and still offer 2 hour fire protection.

Fire Rated Glass is a Bear Glass specialty. We look forward to working with you on your next project! Call us with your special needs and your unusual requirements. Competitive prices, outstanding delivery dates, and close interactive customer service make Bear Glass a perfect choice for your next job. We are committed to delivering a premium level service – providing speed, quality and simplicity throughout the entire process. Bear Glass is the preferred supplier to many of America’s best Architects, Designers, Builders and more.

We ship Fire Rated Glass worldwide.

Representatives from Bear Glass will be available  to answer questions about our line of Fire Rated Glass. To learn more, or to order  Bear Glass Fire Rated Glass:

FACTORY/OFFICE

Address:
Bear Glass Inc.
399 20th Street
Brooklyn, NY 11215
Phone: 718-832-3604
Fax: 718-832-0786
Email: bearglass@yahoo.com
website: www.fireratedglass.com